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Shariah & Homosexuality

Sharia sure ain’t gay

In countries that practice Shariah Law, gay men and women are cruelly and severely punished for their “crimes”, often being put to death.



Answering Islam
Iran
By James M. Arlandson

Traditional Muslims who understand the Quran and the hadith (reports of Muhammad’s words and actions outside of the Quran) believe that Islamic law or sharia expresses the highest and best goals for all societies. It is the will of Allah.

In February 1998, the Taliban, who once ruled in Afghanistan, ordered this punishment for three men convicted of sodomy:

On Wednesday, the Taleban ordered the execution of three men for sodomy in the southern town of Kandahar, southern Afghanistan. They were ordered to be buried alive under a pile of stones and a wall was pushed on top of them by a tank.

Their lives were to be spared if they survived for 30 minutes and were still alive when the stones were removed.

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Iran: Private Homes Raided for Immorality

Iranian authorities arrest over 30 men for participating in homosexual activities in a private home. Human Rights Watch calls the arrests an invasion of privacy.



IranPressNews
March 28, 2008
Esfahan, Iran

The arrest of more than 30 men attending a party in a private home in the city of Esfahan signals renewed efforts by Iranian authorities to enforce ômorality¤ codes, and highlights the fragility of basic rights in a country where police powers routinely undermine privacy, Human Rights Watch said today.

It urged Iranian authorities to release the men reportedly arrested in late February, and to drop charges against people accused of consensual homosexual conduct, drinking alcohol, and other related ômorals¤ offenses.

When police routinely break down doors to enforce a brand of morality, it means a line has been crossed to invade peopleْs privacy at any time,¤ said Joe Stork, Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. Iranْs repressive system of controlling peopleْs dress, behavior, and personal lives violates fundamental rights.¤

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IRAN/death penalty: A State Terror Policy

Iran ranks first for per capita executions. Ethnic and religious minorities, homosexuals, juveniles are often targeted. According to Shariah Law, “offences” such as apostasy and adultery are punishable by death. This in-dept report generated by the International Federation for Human Rights covers Iran’s climate of terror in the name of Islam.



International Federation for Human Rights Report
April 2009
Iran

Introduction

At a time when momentum is gathering across the world to abolish capital punishment, the Islamic Republic of Iran (IRI) currently ranks second for number of executions, after China, and first for per capita executions in the world. According to the World Coalition against the Death Penalty, Iran executed at least 317 people in 2007, almost twice as many as in 2006 and four times as many as in 2005. In 2008, at least 346 executions were recorded. From January through the end of March 2009, Amnesty International has recorded 120 executions. These numbers are certainly below reality, since there are no publicly available statistics on executions carried out in the country.

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Gay Men Face Jail in Egypt, Kuwait in Bid to Appease Islamists

Egyptian police search for homosexuals in Cairo, hoping to remove them. 
By Daniel Williams

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Gay Men Face Jail in Egypt, Kuwait in Bid to Appease Islamists
April 8, 2008
Cairo, Egypt

The young men who loitered at the west end of the Qasr El-Nil Bridge in Cairo spied the blue pickup truck, a sign they should scatter.

"They're police," said Ahmed A., making a two-finger gesture on his shoulder to indicate epaulets. "They park and the pigs come out and grab everyone they can."
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Private Homes Raided for "Immorality"

Human Rights Watch: Authorities Escalate Arbitrary Arrests, Harassment

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Iran: Private Homes Raided for "Immorality"
March 28, 2008
Iran

The arrest of more than 30 men attending a party in a private home in the city of Esfahan signals renewed efforts by Iranian authorities to enforce ômorality¤ codes, and highlights the fragility of basic rights in a country where police powers routinely undermine privacy, Human Rights Watch said today.

It urged Iranian authorities to release the men reportedly arrested in late February, and to drop charges against people accused of consensual homosexual conduct, drinking alcohol, and other related morals offenses.

When police routinely break down doors to enforce a brand of morality, it means a line has been crossed to invade peopleْs privacy at any time,¤ said Joe Stork, Middle East director at Human Rights Watch. ôIranْs repressive system of controlling peopleْs dress, behavior, and personal lives violates fundamental rights.
Read more...
 
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