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Shariah in Government

McChrystal Sees Taliban Role

When asked if he would be content to see Taliban leaders in a future government in Kabul, General Stanley McChrystal, the Nato commander in Afghanistan, remarked, “I think any Afghans can play a role if they focus on the future, and not the past… As a soldier, my personal feeling is that there’s been enough fighting…What I think we do is try to shape conditions which allow people to come to a truly equitable solution to how the Afghan people are governed.” The Taliban enforces strict adherence to Shariah Law through terror. The Taliban murders Muslims who shave their beards or listen to music… women who walk unaccompanied on the street. The Taliban worked with Osama bin Laden and Al Qaeda to organize the September 11, 2001 attacks on the U.S. from Afghan territory. Given General McChrystal’s objective, as well as the fraud that marred the last Afghan presidential election, how can Afghanistan possibly avoid being ruled under strict Shariah Law?



Financial Times
January 24, 2010
Kabul, Afghanistan

General Stanley McChrystal, the Nato commander in Afghanistan, has raised the prospect that his troop surge will lead to a negotiated peace with the Taliban.

Gen McChrystal will urge his allies to renew their commitment to his strategy at a conference in London this week.

In a Financial Times interview, he acknowledged growing scepticism about the war, but said he was poised to make “very demonstrably positive” progress this year as a result of the arrival of an extra 30,000 US troops.

By using the reinforcements to create an arc of secure territory stretching from the Taliban’s southern heartlands to Kabul, Gen McChrystal aims to weaken the insurgency to the point where its leaders would accept some form of settlement with Afghanistan’s government.

“As a soldier, my personal feeling is that there’s been enough fighting,” he said. “What I think we do is try to shape conditions which allow people to come to a truly equitable solution to how the Afghan people are governed.”

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U.N. Seeks to Drop Some Taliban From Terror List

Kai Eide, the United Nations special representative, has asked Afghan officials to remove senior Taliban leaders from the U.N.’s list of terrorists, as well as ask the American military to speed its review of roughly 750 detainees. Under United Nations Resolution 1267, governments are obliged to freeze the bank accounts and prevent travel of those on the United Nations’ list of terrorists. Essentially, we will be giving senior Taliban officials access to money and freedom with the hope of possible future negotiation.



New York Times
January 24, 2010
Kabul, Afghanistan

The leader of the United Nations mission here called on Afghan officials to seek the removal of at least some senior Taliban leaders from the United Nations’ list of terrorists, as a first step toward opening direct negotiations with the insurgent group.

The United Nations' Kai Eide said he hoped that moves would help lead to talks between Afghan officials and Taliban leaders.

In an interview, Kai Eide, the United Nations special representative, also implored the American military to speed its review of the roughly 750 detainees in its military prisons here — another principal grievance of Taliban leaders. Until recently, the Americans were holding those prisoners at a makeshift detention center at Bagram Air Base and refusing to release their names.

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Two Men Flogged for 'Un-Islamic' Romance

Two young men were publically flogged for having “romantic relationships” that violate Shariah Law. One was caught flirting with a woman. The other had a secret marriage, which often occur in poor regions when a couple cannot afford a wedding. The al-Qaeda-linked Shebab group’s religious police runs the city. Sheikh Mohamed Moalim, a senior Shebab official from Kismayo, Somalia said, “The punishment was only to show that people will be held responsible for violating Sharia (Islamic law). We are here to correct deviant social behaviour and force the people to implement Sharia to the full.” The Shebab religious police also arrested several Somali men last week for shaving their beards, another violation of Shariah Law.



Gulf Times
January 11, 2010
Kismayo, Somalia

The Al-Qaeda-linked Shebab group’s religious police in the Somali city of Kismayo flogged a man for flirting and another for having a “secret marriage”, an official said yesterday.

They received 15 and 39 lashes respectively in front of a crowd in central Kismayo, a large southern harbour which has been under Shebab administration since mid-2008 and where a strict form of Sharia is enforced.

“One of the young men was found engaging in secret wedlock which is illegal under Islamic law,” Sheikh Mohamed Moalim, a senior Shebab official, said from Kismayo.

“The other one was found seducing a lady alone. Both of them confessed to the charges in front of a court and they were publicly punished,” he said.

The flogging took place over the weekend.

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Fears Over Islam Adviser

Wakkas Khan was appointed as a British government advisor on faith issues. Khan has said the following about radical Shariah organization Hizb ut-Tahrir, “Many unsubstantiated accusations have been levied against Hizb ut-Tahrir in the past, but in reality the organisation works to advance the Muslim world by engaging in political work.” Former Shadow Communities Minister Paul Goodman has retorted, “Hizb ut-Tahrir should be banned and it would be unacceptable for any Government adviser to have sympathy for it.” He has publicly raised concerns about Khan’s appointment.



Daily Express
January 10, 2010
London, England

A SENIOR Tory has raised concerns about the appointment of a former Muslim student leader as a Government adviser on faith issues.

Former Shadow Communities Minister Paul Goodman said he was worried about Wakkas Khan’s links to hardline Islamist party Hizb ut-Tahrir.

Mr Khan was appointed to the Government’s new 13-strong panel of faith advisers by Communities Secretary John Denham last week—a list that snubbed the controversial Muslim Council of Britain.

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U.S., Britain Close Embassies in Yemen

Both the U.S. and Britain close their embassies in Yemen due to increasing security threats.



CNN
January 4, 2010
Sana'a, Yemen

Threats by al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula against targets in Yemen prompted the closure of the U.S. and British embassies there Sunday, officials said.

"There are indications that al Qaeda is planning to carry out an attack against a target inside of Sanaa, possibly our embassy," John Brennan, the assistant to the president for homeland security and counterterrorism, said on CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday. "And what we do is to take every measure possible to ensure the safety of our diplomats and citizens abroad, so the decision was made to close the embassy."

The United States is working closely with the Yemeni government on the proper security precautions, he said.

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